​Jacqueline V. Lerner, PhD, Program in Applied Developmental Psychology, Boston College

"This book tackles one of the most daunting tasks that doctoral students face. By breaking down the proposal writing process in a manageable and thorough way, the book educates the student from beginning to end. It is a 'must read' for doctoral students--I would use it in all classes about the dissertation process and assign it to all doctoral students as soon as they start their program! It also will be valuable for general research methods classes at the graduate level and any classes leading up to the doctoral dissertation requirement. Students will benefit from the concrete examples that bring the process to life."


Steven D. Zink, PhD, Vice Chancellor, Nevada System of Higher Education


“Many students flounder in the process of writing a dissertation proposal. Terrell's book treats in depth what other works on writing a dissertation dispatch in a few paragraphs. He recognizes not only the importance but also the complexity of writing the problem statement and other elements of the proposal, and provides students with expert guidance in how to capture precisely a study's importance within a defined scope. Terrell's insights are wise and on target; students will find them to be of great value.”

Susan Troncoso Skidmore, PhD, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University


The style is accessible and conversational; perfect for apprehensive doctoral students who need a broad overview of the proposal process. I like the way the purpose statement is broken down into variables, participants, and location; this will be helpful to students.”


Frederick J. Brigham, PhD, Special Education Program, George Mason University


“This book demystifies the entire dissertation proposal process, and is particularly helpful in the area of considering and refining a research problem. A major strength is the way Terrell clarifies the process by analyzing numerous topics in terms of their problem statement, purpose statement, and research question.”


Paul Vincent, PhD, Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Valdosta State University

“Informative and easy to read. Terrell offers a succinct introduction to all the parts of a typical doctoral proposal— introduction, background literature review, and methods—and presents a range of examples for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods approaches. The book provides a very useful perspective on different methodological approaches and how they fit into the doctoral proposal.”